Fort Lee Office

201-461-7595

Irvington Office

973-399-0909

Lyndhurst Location

201-438-8668

Myopia Control

Myopia control or myopia management are treatments used for slowing down childhood myopia progression. The younger a child becomes myopic, the faster they tend to progress, leading to higher levels of myopia. Parents should start a myopia management method as soon as possible. It involves prescribing special types of  contact lenses or atropine drops to slow down worsening of vision.

Ortho-k

What is Ortho-k? Orthokeratology, also commonly known as corneal refractive therapy, vision shaping treatment. Ortho-k is the gentle reshaping of the cornea to correct Myopia (nearsightedness).

Orthokeratology is known by numerous names and the technique has changed significantly over the years.  Ortho-k have been practiced for about 40 years.  The technique involves using a rigid gas permeable lens to flatten or reshape the cornea causing the patient to become less nearsighted.  The process is accomplished while you sleep using a computer designed reverse geometry contact lens.  The lenses are inserted at bedtime and removed in the morning.  The lenses safely and gently reshape the cornea changing the eye's focus.  Most patients will have good vision throughout the day. 

Many recent studies have shown that orthokeratology lenses can prevent the progression of myopia in children. It is important to prevent the progression of nearsightedness in our children The incidence of myopia, in the United States, increased by 66% in the last 30 years. Currently, a multi-center FDA sponsored study is in it's fourth of five years and thus far the preliminary results are confirming that OrthoK  does in fact prevent the progression of nearsightedness.

Orthok is accomplished by using a specially designed contact lens called a reverse geometry lens that flattens the cornea by pushing the central epithelial layers that reside directly over the pupil towards the periphery. This movement of corneal cells causes the center of the cornea to be thinner thus moving the focus of light closer to the retina. By refocusing the light on the retina, the vision is improved.

MiSight

Another great option for myopia control are MiSight contact lenses. These contacts are daily disposable soft contact lenses designed to slow myopia progression in children.

When inserted into the eye, the central part of the MiSight contact lens corrects the refractive error, much like a traditional corrective lens. But the peripheral part of the lens has uniquely designed concentric rings that direct light to focus on the retina. This has been shown to significantly reduce the stimuli causing the eye to grow longer.

The safety and effectiveness of MiSight were studied in a 3-year clinical trial of 135 children aged 8 to 12 who were prescribed either MiSight or traditional soft contact lenses. Over the 3-year period, myopia progressed at a much slower rate — by 59% to be exact — in the children who wore MiSight contact lenses compared to the children who wore conventional soft contacts. These results indicate that MiSight could be an excellent option for slowing myopia progression in your child.

Ortho-k or Misight consultation

Patients interested in Ortho-K or Misight start with an eye exam.  After a comprehensive eye exam, we will start either an Ortho-K consultation or Misight consultation and further discuss treatment options.

Dr. Domingues has been practicing myopia control since she opened her practice in 2011. She has done hundreds of successful fits in Ortho K and is now certified in Misight lenses as well. Call our office and schedule an appointment to further discuss options for your child.  

 

Allergy Management and Your Eyes

Image of woman blowing her nose.

For those who suffer from allergies, exposure to pets, pollen, or dust mites can quickly lead to red, itchy, watery eyes. Although seasonal allergies are notorious for causing eye symptoms, year-round exposure to allergens can be just as problematic. If you develop itchy, red, irritated, puffy, or watery eyes, make an appointment to see your optometrist for diagnosis and treatment recommendations.

What Causes Eye Allergies?

All allergies are caused by an overreaction of the immune system to non-threatening substances. This could be pollen, pet dander, mold spores, feathers, dust mites, perfumes, smoke, or air pollutants. When the mucous membrane covering your eyes comes into contact with one of these allergens, your immune system releases histamine and triggers a response. This causes eyes to become watery, pink or red, itchy, and puffy. You may also experience nasal allergy symptoms.

The First Step: Controlling Allergen Exposure

If you know what triggers your eye allergies, the most important preventative step to take is to limit your exposure. This may mean limiting your time spent outdoors, avoiding homes with pets, switching bed linens to remove feathers or dust mites, or having your home checked for mold. For individuals with seasonal allergies, mid-morning and early evening typically bring the highest pollen counts, so it is smart to stay indoors during those times. Also try to avoid windy days, which can blow pollens and trigger eye allergy symptoms.

Other Tips to Manage Eye Allergy Relief

Many people who suffer from allergies reach for over-the-counter antihistamine medications to manage their symptoms. Although antihistamines often reduce nasal symptoms, the American Optometric Association warns that they can actually increase irritation associated with red, itchy eyes. Antihistamines decrease tear quality and quantity, preventing your body from providing natural eye relief. Instead, ask your eye doctor about prescription medications or eye drops that may be right for you.

Another important step for managing eye allergies is to avoid touching or rubbing your eyes, which can exacerbate symptoms. Cleanse your hands frequently with soap and water, and wash your bed linens and pillow cases in hot water to destroy common allergens.

For contact lens wearers, allergies can be particularly challenging. Wearing contacts may become particularly uncomfortable when you have itchy, irritated eyes. Whenever possible, forego contacts and wear prescription glasses instead. If that is not an option, make sure you replace your contact lenses frequently, and talk to your optometrist about eye drops or single-use lenses.

Sources:
American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (2012). Eye allergy treatment.
American Optometric Association (2011). Set your sights on spring allergy relief.

Locations

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Lyndhurst Office

Monday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Irvington Office

Monday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Friday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Lyndhurst Office

Monday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Irvington Office

Monday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed