Fort Lee Office

201-461-7595

Irvington Office

973-399-0909

Lyndhurst Location

201-438-8668

Myopia Control

Myopia control or myopia management are treatments used for slowing down childhood myopia progression. The younger a child becomes myopic, the faster they tend to progress, leading to higher levels of myopia. Parents should start a myopia management method as soon as possible. It involves prescribing special types of  contact lenses or atropine drops to slow down worsening of vision.

Ortho-k

What is Ortho-k? Orthokeratology, also commonly known as corneal refractive therapy, vision shaping treatment. Ortho-k is the gentle reshaping of the cornea to correct Myopia (nearsightedness).

Orthokeratology is known by numerous names and the technique has changed significantly over the years.  Ortho-k have been practiced for about 40 years.  The technique involves using a rigid gas permeable lens to flatten or reshape the cornea causing the patient to become less nearsighted.  The process is accomplished while you sleep using a computer designed reverse geometry contact lens.  The lenses are inserted at bedtime and removed in the morning.  The lenses safely and gently reshape the cornea changing the eye's focus.  Most patients will have good vision throughout the day. 

Many recent studies have shown that orthokeratology lenses can prevent the progression of myopia in children. It is important to prevent the progression of nearsightedness in our children The incidence of myopia, in the United States, increased by 66% in the last 30 years. Currently, a multi-center FDA sponsored study is in it's fourth of five years and thus far the preliminary results are confirming that OrthoK  does in fact prevent the progression of nearsightedness.

Orthok is accomplished by using a specially designed contact lens called a reverse geometry lens that flattens the cornea by pushing the central epithelial layers that reside directly over the pupil towards the periphery. This movement of corneal cells causes the center of the cornea to be thinner thus moving the focus of light closer to the retina. By refocusing the light on the retina, the vision is improved.

MiSight

Another great option for myopia control are MiSight contact lenses. These contacts are daily disposable soft contact lenses designed to slow myopia progression in children.

When inserted into the eye, the central part of the MiSight contact lens corrects the refractive error, much like a traditional corrective lens. But the peripheral part of the lens has uniquely designed concentric rings that direct light to focus on the retina. This has been shown to significantly reduce the stimuli causing the eye to grow longer.

The safety and effectiveness of MiSight were studied in a 3-year clinical trial of 135 children aged 8 to 12 who were prescribed either MiSight or traditional soft contact lenses. Over the 3-year period, myopia progressed at a much slower rate — by 59% to be exact — in the children who wore MiSight contact lenses compared to the children who wore conventional soft contacts. These results indicate that MiSight could be an excellent option for slowing myopia progression in your child.

Ortho-k or Misight consultation

Patients interested in Ortho-K or Misight start with an eye exam.  After a comprehensive eye exam, we will start either an Ortho-K consultation or Misight consultation and further discuss treatment options.

Dr. Domingues has been practicing myopia control since she opened her practice in 2011. She has done hundreds of successful fits in Ortho K and is now certified in Misight lenses as well. Call our office and schedule an appointment to further discuss options for your child.  

 

Dyslexia

Young girl having trouble reading

Young girl having trouble reading

Dyslexia

When a child has difficulty reading due to problems recognizing speech sounds and learning how they connect to words and letters, the condition is known as dyslexia, a learning disorder caused by genetic traits that disturb how the brain works. It affects areas of the brain dealing with language and inhibits one’s ability to translate words and written letters into speech.

Dyslexia commonly occurs in children, although it may go undiagnosed for years and not recognized until adulthood. Symptoms may be hard to spot prior to the child attending school, but it is not impossible. Early warning signs include:

  • Challenges playing rhyming games or learning nursery rhymes
  • Talking later than what is considered normal
  • Learning new words at a slow pace

How Dyslexia Can Affect Cognitive Processes

Once a child begins school, his or her teacher may be the first to recognize the signs of dyslexia, particularly when he or she begins to learn how to read. This may come in the form of the child:

  • Having trouble comprehending instructions
  • Struggling to process and grasp what is heard
  • Having difficulty remembering sequences
  • Reading well below the level expected for their age
  • Having problems spelling and seeing likenesses/distinctions in words and letters
  • Failing to sound out the pronunciation of a word he or she is unaccustomed to

If dyslexia is not recognized by the time the child has reached adolescence or adulthood, he or she may have:

  • Challenges with time management
  • Trouble reading, even aloud
  • Problems summing up a story
  • Difficulty understanding expressions or jokes with a meaning not easily understood from the idioms
  • Obstacles with memorization and math problems

When diagnosing dyslexia, a doctor will request a variety of tests and look at a number of factors, including vision. Learning is achieved via intricate and interconnected processes, one of which is vision. Concluding the relationship between vision and learning requires assessing vision acuity (clarity of sight) and eye health, among other things. Having a vision test can assist with determining whether another disorder is the cause or adding to the child’s reading disability.

How Do You Treat Dyslexia?

If vision is the source or part of a learning-related vision problem, the optometrist’s goal will be to provide treatment necessary to improve visual function and reduce associated symptoms and signs. This may include prisms, eye drops, lenses, vision therapy or other visual aids.

It should be noted that while some proponents of vision therapy contend that it is an absolute treatment for dyslexia, professional optometric associations state that vision therapy does not directly treat dyslexia and other learning disabilities. Rather, vision therapy can be used to improve visual processing and visual competence, which then allows the child to be more receptive to education instruction. Therefore, vision therapy should be used in conjunction with other multidisciplinary approaches, such as tutoring and a specialized education program.

Vision therapy may include, but is not limited to, the following activities:

  • Looking through prisms
  • Donning an eye patch during a portion of the therapy session
  • Performing letter-finding puzzles
  • Putting tinted plastic over reading material, or wearing tinted glasses while reading material
  • Eye exercises

Each session takes about an hour and is done up to twice a week. Depending on the condition and how the child progresses, this therapy may be needed for three months to a year.

Locations

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Lyndhurst Office

Monday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Irvington Office

Monday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Friday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Lyndhurst Office

Monday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Irvington Office

Monday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed