Fort Lee Office

201-461-7595

Irvington Office

973-399-0909

Lyndhurst Location

201-438-8668

Myopia Control

Myopia control or myopia management are treatments used for slowing down childhood myopia progression. The younger a child becomes myopic, the faster they tend to progress, leading to higher levels of myopia. Parents should start a myopia management method as soon as possible. It involves prescribing special types of  contact lenses or atropine drops to slow down worsening of vision.

Ortho-k

What is Ortho-k? Orthokeratology, also commonly known as corneal refractive therapy, vision shaping treatment. Ortho-k is the gentle reshaping of the cornea to correct Myopia (nearsightedness).

Orthokeratology is known by numerous names and the technique has changed significantly over the years.  Ortho-k have been practiced for about 40 years.  The technique involves using a rigid gas permeable lens to flatten or reshape the cornea causing the patient to become less nearsighted.  The process is accomplished while you sleep using a computer designed reverse geometry contact lens.  The lenses are inserted at bedtime and removed in the morning.  The lenses safely and gently reshape the cornea changing the eye's focus.  Most patients will have good vision throughout the day. 

Many recent studies have shown that orthokeratology lenses can prevent the progression of myopia in children. It is important to prevent the progression of nearsightedness in our children The incidence of myopia, in the United States, increased by 66% in the last 30 years. Currently, a multi-center FDA sponsored study is in it's fourth of five years and thus far the preliminary results are confirming that OrthoK  does in fact prevent the progression of nearsightedness.

Orthok is accomplished by using a specially designed contact lens called a reverse geometry lens that flattens the cornea by pushing the central epithelial layers that reside directly over the pupil towards the periphery. This movement of corneal cells causes the center of the cornea to be thinner thus moving the focus of light closer to the retina. By refocusing the light on the retina, the vision is improved.

MiSight

Another great option for myopia control are MiSight contact lenses. These contacts are daily disposable soft contact lenses designed to slow myopia progression in children.

When inserted into the eye, the central part of the MiSight contact lens corrects the refractive error, much like a traditional corrective lens. But the peripheral part of the lens has uniquely designed concentric rings that direct light to focus on the retina. This has been shown to significantly reduce the stimuli causing the eye to grow longer.

The safety and effectiveness of MiSight were studied in a 3-year clinical trial of 135 children aged 8 to 12 who were prescribed either MiSight or traditional soft contact lenses. Over the 3-year period, myopia progressed at a much slower rate — by 59% to be exact — in the children who wore MiSight contact lenses compared to the children who wore conventional soft contacts. These results indicate that MiSight could be an excellent option for slowing myopia progression in your child.

Ortho-k or Misight consultation

Patients interested in Ortho-K or Misight start with an eye exam.  After a comprehensive eye exam, we will start either an Ortho-K consultation or Misight consultation and further discuss treatment options.

Dr. Domingues has been practicing myopia control since she opened her practice in 2011. She has done hundreds of successful fits in Ortho K and is now certified in Misight lenses as well. Call our office and schedule an appointment to further discuss options for your child.  

 

Crossed Eyes

Boy with crossed eyes

Crossed eyes, also known as strabismus, refer to a condition in which both eyes do not look at the same place at the same time. Often times they both turn in, but may also turn out.

What Causes Crossed Eyes?

The six muscles attached to each eye, which control how it moves, receive signals from the brain. These signals direct the eye’s movements. In normal circumstances, the eyes work in an organized fashion so that both point in the same direction at the same time. With crossed eyes, however, the muscles around the eyes do not work together because some are weaker than others. This causes the eyes to turn inward or in the opposite direction of each other.

It is important to have proper eye alignment. Misalignment can cause:

  • Double vision
  • Poor depth perception
  • Poor vision in the turned eye
  • Confusion

When the eyes are askew, the brain receives mixed images from each eye. In the beginning, the person may suffer from double vision and misperception. Over time, the brain becomes trained to ignore the image it receives from the weaker eye. But, if left untreated, the person may permanently lose vision in the weaker eye.

Risk factors for crossed eyes include family history, a considerable amount of uncorrected farsightedness and medical conditions like stroke, head injury, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy.

Though crossed eyes can develop in older children and adults, it typically develops in infants and young children by the age of three. Though babies are commonly affected, some experience a condition called false strabismus or pseudostrabismus, in which their eyes may appear misaligned, but they in fact are aiming at the same direction. This appearance of crossed eyes can be due to having excess skin over the inner corner of the eyes, or a wide bridge of the nose. As the child'face grows, the appearance of crossed eyes diminishes.

Ways to Treat Crossed Eyes

If the child does truly have crossed eyes, it is vital that he or she get treated. While some believe that the condition can be outgrown, it cannot. Crossed eyes can worsen without treatment. If you are the parent of a child who is older than four months and notice that his or her eyes do not appear to be straight at all times, an examination is in order.

In order to diagnose crossed eyes, a comprehensive eye exam will be performed, and it will concentrate on how the eyes focus and move. This may consist of:

  • Visual acuity – reading letters on near and distance reading charts in order to measure and evaluate the degree to which vision is impacted
  • A review of the patient’s family history
  • Refraction – an instrument known as a phoropter is used to conclude the right lens power needed to rectify refractive errors like astigmatism, nearsightedness and farsightedness. During the test, a series of lenses are placed in front of the patient’s eyes while a handheld lighted instrument (retinoscope) gauges how they focus light.
  • Focusing and alignment testing to determine how well your eyes move, focus and work in unison.
  • An eye health examination to observe the internal and external structures of the eyes.

The information rendered from these tests will allow your optometrist to develop a treatment plan, which can involve prisms, vision therapy, eyeglasses or eye muscle surgery. If the condition is found and treated early, it can often be corrected with excellent outcomes.

Locations

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Lyndhurst Office

Monday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Irvington Office

Monday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Friday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Lyndhurst Office

Monday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Irvington Office

Monday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed