Fort Lee Office

201-461-7595

Irvington Office

973-399-0909

Lyndhurst Location

201-438-8668

Myopia Control

Myopia control or myopia management are treatments used for slowing down childhood myopia progression. The younger a child becomes myopic, the faster they tend to progress, leading to higher levels of myopia. Parents should start a myopia management method as soon as possible. It involves prescribing special types of  contact lenses or atropine drops to slow down worsening of vision.

Ortho-k

What is Ortho-k? Orthokeratology, also commonly known as corneal refractive therapy, vision shaping treatment. Ortho-k is the gentle reshaping of the cornea to correct Myopia (nearsightedness).

Orthokeratology is known by numerous names and the technique has changed significantly over the years.  Ortho-k have been practiced for about 40 years.  The technique involves using a rigid gas permeable lens to flatten or reshape the cornea causing the patient to become less nearsighted.  The process is accomplished while you sleep using a computer designed reverse geometry contact lens.  The lenses are inserted at bedtime and removed in the morning.  The lenses safely and gently reshape the cornea changing the eye's focus.  Most patients will have good vision throughout the day. 

Many recent studies have shown that orthokeratology lenses can prevent the progression of myopia in children. It is important to prevent the progression of nearsightedness in our children The incidence of myopia, in the United States, increased by 66% in the last 30 years. Currently, a multi-center FDA sponsored study is in it's fourth of five years and thus far the preliminary results are confirming that OrthoK  does in fact prevent the progression of nearsightedness.

Orthok is accomplished by using a specially designed contact lens called a reverse geometry lens that flattens the cornea by pushing the central epithelial layers that reside directly over the pupil towards the periphery. This movement of corneal cells causes the center of the cornea to be thinner thus moving the focus of light closer to the retina. By refocusing the light on the retina, the vision is improved.

MiSight

Another great option for myopia control are MiSight contact lenses. These contacts are daily disposable soft contact lenses designed to slow myopia progression in children.

When inserted into the eye, the central part of the MiSight contact lens corrects the refractive error, much like a traditional corrective lens. But the peripheral part of the lens has uniquely designed concentric rings that direct light to focus on the retina. This has been shown to significantly reduce the stimuli causing the eye to grow longer.

The safety and effectiveness of MiSight were studied in a 3-year clinical trial of 135 children aged 8 to 12 who were prescribed either MiSight or traditional soft contact lenses. Over the 3-year period, myopia progressed at a much slower rate — by 59% to be exact — in the children who wore MiSight contact lenses compared to the children who wore conventional soft contacts. These results indicate that MiSight could be an excellent option for slowing myopia progression in your child.

Ortho-k or Misight consultation

Patients interested in Ortho-K or Misight start with an eye exam.  After a comprehensive eye exam, we will start either an Ortho-K consultation or Misight consultation and further discuss treatment options.

Dr. Domingues has been practicing myopia control since she opened her practice in 2011. She has done hundreds of successful fits in Ortho K and is now certified in Misight lenses as well. Call our office and schedule an appointment to further discuss options for your child.  

 

Convergence Insufficiency

Teen girl rubbing eyes

Convergence insufficiency is a relatively common eye condition that is typically diagnosed in childhood. A study of two large optometry clinics found that 17.6% of children who received vision exams had convergence insufficiency. As this disorder may cause difficulty focusing on written pages, some children with convergence insufficiency are actually diagnosed with learning disability rather than a vision problem. This highlights the necessity of receiving a comprehensive eye exam that tests for this vision problem.

What Is Convergence Insufficiency?

Convergence insufficiency is an eye disorder in which the eyes do not work together properly when focusing on a nearby object. In general, looking at a close object causes the eyes to turn inward, allowing them to focus. If the eyes drift outward, this prevents accurate focusing and is labeled convergence insufficiency.

Symptoms of convergence insufficiency typically manifest when reading, writing, or doing other work that requires focusing on a nearby object. Common symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Double vision
  • Eyestrain
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Difficulty reading. Many patients report that the words seem to swim on the page or blur.
  • Squinting or closing one eye when doing close-up work.

Diagnosis of Convergence Insufficiency

Unfortunately, convergence insufficiency is commonly missed on basic eye exams such as those performed as screening tools at school. A child may seem to have 20/20 vision but still suffer from convergence insufficiency and its associated symptoms.

An optometrist can diagnose convergence insufficiency during a comprehensive vision exam. First, the eye doctor will take a history of signs and symptoms associated with this disorder. Next, the optometrist will conduct a thorough vision exam to detect nearsightedness or other vision problems. Finally, the eye doctor will test the ability of the eyes to focus on nearby objects. This may involve asking the patient to hold the eyes together to focus on a small object or to read through a prism.

Treatment Options

Unlike many other eye problems, convergence insufficiency is not easily treated by eyeglasses (although reading glasses with built-in prisms may be prescribed). Instead, vision therapy exercises teach the eyes how to converge to focus accurately on an object. Your eye doctor can recommend exercises to perform at home or in the office. This may include focusing on a small letter as you move it toward the bridge of your nose, improving the ability of the eyes to turn inward to focus.

Locations

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Lyndhurst Office

Monday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 7:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Irvington Office

Monday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Tuesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Friday

9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am - 7:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am - 6:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Lyndhurst Office

Monday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Wednesday
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Thursday
9:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Irvington Office

Monday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Tuesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wednesday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Friday
9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed

Fort Lee Office

Monday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Tuesday
10:00 am - 7:00 pm
Wednesday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Friday
10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday
10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Sunday
Closed